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Category Archives: Interesting Uke Sites

It Was Fifty Years Ago Today…

The Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper, with its iconic cover art, is possibly the most influential pop album ever, recorded with great ingenuity on just four-tracks back in 1967. A mix of styles, from rock to vaudeville, psychedelic to Indian, it’s seen as an early concept album.

Unsurprisingly, numerous ukulele versions of its songs abound. Dip into most of our regularly recommended YouTube artists & songbook sites to find some of these well-known tunes lurking. However, for those seeking chords to the entire album, why not try Beatle-lele or Stewart Greenhill? The former site has interesting playing tips (& we use his version of Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds); the latter allows for easy transposing or showing in different layouts.

Eat My Uke gives tabs of the main riffs for all of the tunes, played here in a medley:

 

And here’s WS64 playing the album in full:

 

Now you know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall!

 

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How Do You Feel About The Ukulele? – Survey & Interviews

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Emma Winston (image from  usesthis.com/interviews)

Local Goldsmiths’ PhD student and musician, Emma Winston, is currently collecting information from the ukulele community for her research into the instrument, surrounding how people perceive it and their participation in uke groups. The results will eventually form part of her doctoral research.

Players and non-players are invited to take this short survey. Emma is also at the stage where anyone keen to talk ukuleles with her further is welcome to email her. She is conducting informal interviews – more just general fact-finding chats than a huge list of questions – which can be face-to-face, over the phone, by Skype, email or whatever suits you best!

Extract and photo from an recent interview on The Setup:

I’m Emma Winston, and I’m a PhD student, musician, teaching assistant, sound artist, and botmaker.

I’m in my first year of an MPhil/PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, where I’m studying the contemporary subculture surrounding the ukulele and the people who play it, particularly as that relates to identity and creativity. I’m still in the very early days of research, but it’s an instrument marked out by beginner-friendliness, a DIY aesthetic and real passion for what is often seen as a novelty or joke instrument (despite quite a long and rich multicultural history). In the last few years it’s increasingly become bound up in narratives of gentrification, twee middle-class aesthetics and hipster culture; yet it was also the only instrument recorded to have sold more, not less, during the depths of the UK economic recession, and has formed the centre of community activity for everything from mass world record attempts to music therapy groups for Alzheimers. It’s a fascinating instrument, largely because the ways in which people use it are fascinating, and if you’re reading this and have any particular interest in (or hatred of!) it please do get in touch, since I’m currently at the ‘talk-to-as-many-interesting-people-as-possible’ stage of research.

Survey : http://ukulelesare.xyz/

Emma’s email address: e.winston@gold.ac.uk.

Various PLUC members have past & present connections with Goldsmiths, so we’re pleased to mention this interesting project on our website.

Goldsmiths, University of London, is one of the UK’s leading universities for the creative arts, from film and art to popular music. Notable musicians who studied there include Damon Alban, Katy B, James Blake, Graham Coxon, Neil Innes, Alex James, Rosie Lowe, Andrew Poppy, Adrian Sutton, Errollyn Wallen MBE & Amelia Warner (aka Slow Moving Millie). Regular & varied music performances, talks and festivals take place during the year, most of them open to the public & many completely free, ranging from classical to contemporary, electronic to pop, featuring established performers, recent graduates & students.

 

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New Year’s Workouts

Happy 2017!

Sheila's 50th IMG_0844

Sheila’s 50th – PLUC

  • If you’ve just received your first ukulele, then have a look round our site for playing tips, such as our New Uke For Xmas? article which directs you to some beginners’ guide and handy resources. Or search down the right hand side of the page for the many topics we cover.
  • Should you wish to buy a uke, check out our recommendations for decent starter instruments in Good Buy To All That….
  • For those of you wishing to access some online lessons,  James Hill’s Booster Uke is free until the end of Jan 2017, which will get you moving up & down the fretboard.
  • For a bit of a workout, why not try out the Chord Quiz on Ukulele Go or head over to Uke Hunt’s more challenging Ukulele Quiz 2016.

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Hollesley 2016 – Farewell

It was that Hollesley time of year again, but sunny Suffolk was a mix of joy and sadness as it was to be the last year at this site. Still it didn’t dampen the spirits, the revelry or uke playing.

Hollesley 2016 – Phil Doleman, Rufus & others playing Enjoy Yourself (filmed by almuzo):

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UkeTubes

It’s Ringo Starr’s 76th birthday today, so here’s BirdsEyeViewOfMyUke’s version of his solo hit It Don’t Come Easy (self-penned by Ringo, with a little help from George Harrison). Don’t forget to say “Peace & Love!” at midday.

 
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Posted by on July 7, 2016 in Interesting Uke Sites

 

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Croydon Ukulele Festival – 5 & 6 Mar 2016

Croydon hosts its first ever ukulele festival on Sat 5 & Sun 6 Mar, with workshops, mass busks and performances from different groups, dotted around various pubs throughout the weekend. There are two main evening concerts: the one on the Sat features Phil Doleman & Sunday’s show is by two comedy ukers, Elliot Mason & Jo Stephenson.

See the Croydon Ukulele Festival main page for more details.

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Want to brush up on your knowledge of the fretboard? Need to know how to relate written music to the notes you play? Then head over to Tom Potts’ handy Ukulele Note Finder tool.

All you need to do is hover over a position on the fretboard & it’ll tell you where else you’ll find notes of the same pitch (ie octave) elsewhere on other strings. Or, if you are looking at a piece of music, go to the bottom of the screen, find the note on the stave you have to identify, & it gives you your various playing options on the fretboard.

In the example below, you can see there are four high Cs (C5) on a standard gCEA-tuned 12 fret instrument. The open C string is an octave lower –  C4 / middle C. Use the various search boxes on the right hand side of the PLUC site pages to look up more articles, tools & tips from us about very basic understanding of music, notes & fretboards if this is all unfamiliar to you!

 

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