RSS

Author Archives: webmasterpluc

About webmasterpluc

PLUC webmaster. Uke player from Brockley, the Brassica of SE London.

PLUC Weekend Workout

Tamás Gáll has just developed a new chord training site called It’s Chordtime, which allows you to change chords to a regular metronome tempo and help become a smoother player.

  • The initial page lets you select a number of chords to practice – either random or specifically picked ones. You can choose a set or random progression. Optionally it shows suggested chord diagrams (uke or guitar).
  • On the second page it’s possible to alter the playing speed & number of beats per bar. The next chord coming up is shown so you can ready your fingers to move efficiently.
  • You could easily adapt this to choose chords in a specific song you’re learning, to improve a strumming pattern or polish a new picking technique, increasing the pace gradually as you progress.
It's Chordtime - Screendump

It’s Chordtime – Screendump

Do give it a try and let him know any feedback you have for potential enhancements. And if you enjoy this, have a look at our other PLUC Weekend Workout & PLUCking Ukes postings, including Uncle Rod’s Ukulele Boot Camp chord drills & musictheory.net’s Fretboard Memorisation Tool, which can also aid your playing speed and accuracy.

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Video

Shipping Forecast – Sailing By For 150 Years

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Shipping Forecast – the world’s longest continuous weather forecast. Warning of storms in thirty-one sea areas around the British Isles in a specific & concise format, it was originally sent by telegraph & then transferred to radio. The BBC have been broadcasting it four times a day since 1924, with a short interruption during WWII.

The 0048 broadcast is undeniably the most popular. In addition to it still being a vital aid to seafarers, many Radio 4 listeners use the soothing tones of the announcers to help them fall asleep, especially as this edition is preceded by the gentle lilting sounds of Ronald Binge’s Sailing By (played to help fill any gap between the previous programme to ensure the forecast starts punctually & also to allow a recognisable signal by which people can tune in).

See our Sailing By article from Radders, where he discusses that it’s his favourite PLUC tune.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

End Of An Era – Kitty Lux

In this week’s PLUC session we were all very shocked and saddened to learn the news that Kitty Lux of the Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain had died. Co-founder and Director of the UOGB, she was a major force behind the Orchestra.

She had been ill for a while and thus unable to perform on stage with them for the last few years. Here’s Kitty’s rendition of the Lou Reed number Satellite of Love:

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

UkeTubes

It’s Paul McCartney’s 75th birthday today (or maybe not, if you subscribe to the Paul Is Dead conspiracy rumours!). Here’s Cynthia Lin with her version of Maybe I’m Amazed. If you’ve not viewed her YouTube channel yet, it’s well worth a look & includes some interesting free uke tutorials.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

It Was Fifty Years Ago Today…

The Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper, with its iconic cover art, is possibly the most influential pop album ever, recorded with great ingenuity on just four-tracks back in 1967. A mix of styles, from rock to vaudeville, psychedelic to Indian, it’s seen as an early concept album.

Unsurprisingly, numerous ukulele versions of its songs abound. Dip into most of our regularly recommended YouTube artists & songbook sites to find some of these well-known tunes lurking. However, for those seeking chords to the entire album, why not try Beatle-lele or Stewart Greenhill? The former site has interesting playing tips (& we use his version of Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds); the latter allows for easy transposing or showing in different layouts.

Eat My Uke gives tabs of the main riffs for all of the tunes, played here in a medley:

 

And here’s WS64 playing the album in full:

 

Now you know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pratts Bottom Village Fete May 2017

Once again we had a very enjoyable afternoon performing at the Pratts Bottom Village Fete. The rain held off & things weren’t as windy as last year!

Here are a few photos of us between sets. As always, we’re available for bookings so contact us if you’d like us to perform at your event.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in PLUC News & Info

 

Tags: , , , ,

How Do You Feel About The Ukulele? – Survey & Interviews

portrait

Emma Winston (image from  usesthis.com/interviews)

Local Goldsmiths’ PhD student and musician, Emma Winston, is currently collecting information from the ukulele community for her research into the instrument, surrounding how people perceive it and their participation in uke groups. The results will eventually form part of her doctoral research.

Players and non-players are invited to take this short survey. Emma is also at the stage where anyone keen to talk ukuleles with her further is welcome to email her. She is conducting informal interviews – more just general fact-finding chats than a huge list of questions – which can be face-to-face, over the phone, by Skype, email or whatever suits you best!

Extract and photo from an recent interview on The Setup:

I’m Emma Winston, and I’m a PhD student, musician, teaching assistant, sound artist, and botmaker.

I’m in my first year of an MPhil/PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London, where I’m studying the contemporary subculture surrounding the ukulele and the people who play it, particularly as that relates to identity and creativity. I’m still in the very early days of research, but it’s an instrument marked out by beginner-friendliness, a DIY aesthetic and real passion for what is often seen as a novelty or joke instrument (despite quite a long and rich multicultural history). In the last few years it’s increasingly become bound up in narratives of gentrification, twee middle-class aesthetics and hipster culture; yet it was also the only instrument recorded to have sold more, not less, during the depths of the UK economic recession, and has formed the centre of community activity for everything from mass world record attempts to music therapy groups for Alzheimers. It’s a fascinating instrument, largely because the ways in which people use it are fascinating, and if you’re reading this and have any particular interest in (or hatred of!) it please do get in touch, since I’m currently at the ‘talk-to-as-many-interesting-people-as-possible’ stage of research.

Survey : http://ukulelesare.xyz/

Emma’s email address: e.winston@gold.ac.uk.

Various PLUC members have past & present connections with Goldsmiths, so we’re pleased to mention this interesting project on our website.

Goldsmiths, University of London, is one of the UK’s leading universities for the creative arts, from film and art to popular music. Notable musicians who studied there include Damon Alban, Katy B, James Blake, Graham Coxon, Neil Innes, Alex James, Rosie Lowe, Andrew Poppy, Adrian Sutton, Errollyn Wallen MBE & Amelia Warner (aka Slow Moving Millie). Regular & varied music performances, talks and festivals take place during the year, most of them open to the public & many completely free, ranging from classical to contemporary, electronic to pop, featuring established performers, recent graduates & students.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,