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Tag Archives: Intro To Music Theory

PLUC Weekend Workout

Want to brush up on your knowledge of the fretboard? Need to know how to relate written music to the notes you play? Then head over to Tom Potts’ handy Ukulele Note Finder tool.

All you need to do is hover over a position on the fretboard & it’ll tell you where else you’ll find notes of the same pitch (ie octave) elsewhere on other strings. Or, if you are looking at a piece of music, go to the bottom of the screen, find the note on the stave you have to identify, & it gives you your various playing options on the fretboard.

In the example below, you can see there are four high Cs (C5) on a standard gCEA-tuned 12 fret instrument. The open C string is an octave lower –  C4 / middle C. Use the various search boxes on the right hand side of the PLUC site pages to look up more articles, tools & tips from us about very basic understanding of music, notes & fretboards if this is all unfamiliar to you!

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Uke Nut is an interesting blog, covering various ukulele resources, including links to a selection of fingerstyle tunes & practice drills. Amongst the instructional postings are some links to a useful site of tools – MusicTheory.net.

Uke Nut has customised the Fretboard Memorisation Tool for a standard gCEA-tuned uke. Use it to practice identifying the notes up to the 10th fret. This will help you develop your skills, including helping you form moveable chords more readily.

Ukulele Fretboard Memorization Tool from MusicTheory.net, customised by Uke Nut

Ukulele Fretboard Memorization Tool from MusicTheory.net, customised by Uke Nut

 

More PLUC fretboard-relatedmoveable chord & quiz posts.

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Chris has found this interesting lecture from the basic Listening To Music course by Yale University and feels it would repay many members of our group for the time spent watching it.

It opens with a preamble about musical notation & the reasons we use it (also mentioned in last month’s PLUC Weekend Workout & other music theory postings if you need more detail). Then the majority of Prof Craig Wright’s talk covers rhythm in many music styles, showing how different time signatures sound & getting students to listen to various pieces of music so they can conduct along to the beat. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

There are so many online learning resources out there, it’s difficult to know where to start! One of the interesting sources is TED-Ed, who create ‘lessons worth sharing’. They produce fun & informative videos & lectures on numerous topics. Here are three for you to view for starters. Read the rest of this entry »

 

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PLUCking Ukes – Ten Minute Practice Tips

Tyler Austenfield, from Ten Thumbs Productions produces several free uke lessons every week, from how to play various songs from beginners to intermediate level and different techniques, such as fingerstyle, blues & chords (barres, progressions etc). A section on music theory is planned soon. Here is part one of his recent fingerstyle course: Read the rest of this entry »

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Colour-coded musical notes: uke fretboard, tab & musical stave

Rainbow Music Ukulele Map

People learn ukulele & music theory differently, so I was interested to find the Rainbow Music site, which offers free on-line music lessons, basing learning round colour-coded musical notes.

Although you need to register to access the members’ area, once you’ve done so there is plenty to see & practice without needing to buy their paid-for resources: Read the rest of this entry »

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Yet another free courses website is ALISON. There are over 300 courses available, including an Introduction To Music Theory. Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on February 16, 2014 in Playing Help – Sites & Resources

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

Yhancik's LastGraph - Rainbow

Yhancik’s LastGraph – Rainbow Music Soundwaves (Photo credit: yhancik)

Try Hooktheory’s daily ear training challenges to see if you can identify the notes or chords in a song. There are three levels: beginners, intermediate & advanced. See if you can top the leaderboard for solving the puzzle accurately & quickly.

Other PLUC music theory postings.

Other quizzes include: A Question of Uke – TV & Movie ThemesPLUC Weekend Workout – Flashcard Machine Ukulele ChordsPLUC Weekend Workout – Theta Music TrainerPLUC Weekend Workout – memrise on-line coursesPLUC Weekend Workout – Speak Ukulele Challenge!PLUC Weekend Workout – On-line Ear TrainerPLUC Weekend Workout – EarMaster Reference Songs For IntervalsPLUC Weekend Workout – Music Tech Teacher; PLUC Weekend Workout – Fretboard Master GamePLUC Weekend Workout – Guitarator Chord QuizPLUC Weekend Workout – Vocal Match Game; PLUC Weekend Workout – Open University Intro To Music Theory

 

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PLUC Weekend Workout

We’re often asked questions in club nights about music theory. There are already a number of useful articles on our website &, recently, I spotted that the Open University offer this free introductory course An Introduction To Music Theory on their Open Learn site. Read the rest of this entry »

 
 

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Very, Very, Very Basic Understanding of Music for Absolute Beginners

In this article I shall attempt to lay out the very basis of how music works in a straightforward, easily understood fashion. Please, if you’re a beginner, don’t be put off by the idea of learning and understanding anything about music. The basic stuff is really easy to grasp and will enhance your playing and following of what’s going on when you play with others. If you’re already into music this isn’t for you, it’s for those with no understanding at all.

Musical Notes – The Octave & Chromatic Scale

If you play a note and then double the frequency (ie the number of times a string vibrates in one second) you get the same note but higher. This is called an octave and can be heard on a ukulele if you play an open string and then count 12 frets up the fingerboard and play that note. It’s the same note an octave higher.

Listen to an octave being played from Wikipedia:

Read the rest of this entry »

 

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